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Posted By Art Baxter
HENRY Monday - 08

This HENRY cartoon was drawn by his creator Carl Anderson between 1932 and 1934 for the SATURDAY EVENING POST. Look for a new HENRY cartoon every Monday.

Find out more about HENRY here.


 
Posted By Art Baxter
rat_fink 
 
Posted By Art Baxter

HENRY Monday - 07

This HENRY cartoon was drawn by his creator Carl Anderson between 1932 and 1934 for the SATURDAY EVENING POST. Look for a new HENRY cartoon every Monday.

Find out more about HENRY here.


 
Posted By Art Baxter
Billy

 


 
Posted By Art Baxter

baltan_seijin-1

It's BALTAN!

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Episode #2 - "Blast the Invaders"
Written by Kitao Senzoku
Directed by Toshihiro Iijma
Original Broadcast Date: July 24, 1966

Episode #16 - "Science Patrol Into Space"
Written by Kitao Senzoku
Directed by Toshihiro Iijma
Original Broadcast Date: October 30, 1966

BALTAN is the most memorable of the Ultraman Kaiju. These lobster men, aside from their ingenious design have a haunting unforgettable laugh. They were the first alien invaders faced by Ultraman and the only menace to return for a second episode. The design of the BALTAN changed quite a bit between its first and second appearance.


 
Posted By Art Baxter

sid_flo-2sid_flo-1.gif

Hey, how 'bout some new stuff from my sketchbook.

Here are some drawings of Sid Wilks and Flo Booth.

Sid is in the now. Flo is in the late 1960s. Don't ask. More on this later.


 
Posted By Art Baxter

HENRY Monday - 06

This HENRY cartoon was drawn by his creator Carl Anderson between 1932 and 1934 for the SATURDAY EVENING POST. Look for a new HENRY cartoon every Monday.

Find out more about HENRY here.


 
Posted By Art Baxter

mephilas_seijin-1

It's MEPHILAS!

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Episode #33 - "The Forbidden World"
Written by Tetsuo Kinjo
Directed by Toshitsugu Suzuki
Original Broadcast Date: February 26, 1967

MEPHILAS is a levelheaded pragmatist when it comes to taking over the Earth as opposed to the bumbling Zarab. He does what any levelheaded conqueror of worlds should do: kidnap a child and try to strike up a bargain with him for the planet. Unfortunately he kidnapped the wrong kid; the youngest brother of Science Patrol member, Fuji. The kid can't be bought, or as he himself says, "after all, it isn't my Earth." MEPHILAS's own name is similar to Mephisto which would go with his Faustian bargain. He could be viewed as a demon or a devil.

MEPHILAS finally proceeds to do what we've all been waiting for. I.E. pick a fight with Ultraman. After a few energy bolts are hurled and a few throw-downs, MEPHILAS throws in the towel. As he says, he and Ultraman are evenly matched and would only battle until both are dead. What would be the point of that? As he teleports away, he laughs and proclaims they will meet to fight another day. Ultraman pauses to reflect and then takes off himself.

MEPHILAS is the first of the two Ultraman kaiju to have strobing lights in the face to signify speech. He is completely black except for the silver trim and colored eye and mouth lights on his face. His features are cat-like and has a collar-like shape at his neck. It's an impressive design to say the least. It's very effective. I always kind of liked the fact that he could fight Ultraman but the final result just wouldn't be worth it. Another favorite of mine.

Generally, I draw from the figure once a week. There weren't any classes between mid December and the beginning of February but I wanted to keep my hand in it. I thought it would be fun to draw some monsters from Eiji Tsuburaya's late 1960s TV show, ULTRAMAN. This is the fourth one.


 
Posted By Art Baxter
HENRY Monday - 05

This HENRY cartoon was drawn by his creator Carl Anderson between 1932 and 1934 for the SATURDAY EVENING POST. Look for a new HENRY cartoon every Monday.

Find out more about HENRY here.


 
Posted By Art Baxter

zareb-seijin

It's ZARAB!

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                                      The streets of Tokyo are blanketed in radioactive fog                                           and a disguised ZARAB takes a stroll!

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ZARAB gets shot in the groin by a particle beam while sticking to the side of a building!

Episode #18 - "Brother from another World"
Written by Tetsuo Kinojo & Ryu Minamikawa
Directed by Samaji Yanagase
Broadcast Date: November 13, 1966.

ZARAB is a real tool who can't seem to get anything right when it comes to conquering the Earth. First, a radioactive fog descends on Tokyo in which a cloaked figure, later to be revealed as alien, seems to be lurking about. Then, that same alien, ZARAB, appears in Science Patrol headquarters saying he would be glad to remove the fog and that he has no idea where it came from. Yeah, THAT's believable! Now, people can be stupid (I mean, humans did make George Bush president twice!) but we're not THAT dumb. He then tells the Science Patrol that his species and humans are like brothers in the universe and since his species has been around longer, he's like our BIG brother. It doesn't help that the American translators gave ZARAB a whiny nasal monotone to come out his kitchen-sink-drain/sphincter-like mouth. ZARAB is an annoying patronizing asshole. He later has the brilliant idea of disguising himself as an evil doppelgänger Ultraman to turn the city against the guy who already saved the city and surrounding area from over a dozen giant monsters. Ingenious!

Despite being an annoying idiot, ZARAB is an interesting looking alien. His head is metallic silver and his body is purple and brown. He doesn't sport blinking lights when he speaks as many later space aliens will have. There are several great outdoor nighttime scenes with ZARAB. The first is when he is lurking disguised in the fog and then uncloaked sticking on the side of a wall several stories up and later when Ultraman battles his doppelgänger and then ZARAB. The nighttime scenes with those lit up giant monster eyes are always cool looking. A memorable episode.

Generally, I draw from the figure once a week. There weren't any classes between mid December and the beginning of February but I wanted to keep my hand in it. I thought it would be fun to draw some monsters from Eiji Tsuburaya's late 1960s TV show, ULTRAMAN. This is the third one.


 
Posted By Art Baxter

ragon-2

It's RAGON!

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ragon-3

Episode #4 - "Five Seconds Before the Explosion"
Written by Ryu Minamikawa.
Directed by Mimachi Nonagase
Original Broadcast Date: August 7, 1966

RAGON is a kaiju that lives in the sea and is similar in design to the Creature from the Black Lagoon. A bargain basement version that is. It doesn't matter. I really like this fish-faced goon. As for the story...who cares. What this episode has going for it are it's very nice special effects with the giant creature and humans interacting. I must say, that the miniature sets in these shows can vary wildly from beautifully detailed to cheap cardboard boxes with windows, but the optical effects are almost always seamless and very handsome.

It must also be noted that whoever was in this monster suit, most likely sweating profusely under hot studio lights, gives an especially fine performance here. Often the actor will give each kaiju a gesture or a movement that will give the creature a memorable characteristic. Granted, this kaiju is more flexible than most. It doesn't have a giant headpiece that is impossible to see out of let alone breathe in. This is probably the most free-moving costume in the series aside from its titular star. This episode is thrilling and moves at a fast pace. It's good dumb fun!

Generally, I draw from the figure once a week. There weren't any classes between mid December and the beginning of February but I wanted to keep my hand in it. I thought it would be fun to draw some monsters from Eiji Tsuburaya's late 1960s TV show, ULTRAMAN. This is the second one.


 
Posted By Art Baxter

 
Posted By Art Baxter

fox photo

Fontaine Fox - March 3, 1884 - August 9, 1964

Fontaine Fox is famous for his cartoon panel, TOONERVILLE FOLKS, which ran from 1915 to 1955. The comic panel began in 1915. A Sunday color comic strip was added in 1918. Fox emploed an assistant, Arthur Clark, on gags and inking and used a code to indicate how much of a cartoon was his: six parallel lines over Fox's signature meant the cartoon was all his - fewer meant some participation by his assistant. The comic was most popular in the time between the two world wars. Fox changed syndicates twice and eventually gained all rights to his creation. TOONERVILLE FOLKS is almost completely forgotten today.

Toonerville is a small rural town full of eccentric characters. Each character spotlighted has his or her own schtick. Characters include the "Powerful" Katrinka; Pop Whortle and the entire enormous Whortle clan; the Terrible Tempered Mr. Bang, toughest kid in town, Mickey (Himself) McGuire; "Tomboy" Taylor; Grandma Futty, the demon chaperone; "Snake-Tounge" Saunders; Snag Sanders, the town's famous mustache artist, Grandpaw Sims, the hidebound Republican; "Hams" Henderson and  Cynthia Snoop, just to name a few. Perhaps the most famous part of the strip was the rickety Toonerville Trolly run by the white-bearded, Skipper.

It took quite a while for me to warm up to TOONERVILLE FOLKS. In my younger days I preferred comics that favored the clean line. TOONERVILLE was just too sketchy, dashed off and way too corny. Somewhere along the way I had picked up a copy of TOONERVILLE TROLLY by Galewitz and Winslow which collected a sampling of the the panel cartons. As I read I warmed up to the town and it's characters. The humor is broad slapstick but it is really funny. I like the outrageous characters the best. I'm less interested in the Trolly cartoons and the Sunday strip.

Fox's art is sketchy and his line is loose. He is great at body language and capturing a scene as economically as possible. His cartoon is frequently set outdoors with the viewer above the scene looking down at the tiny characters scrambling around. Amazingly, Fox frequently draws six to twelve people interacting in this small panel cartoon. I like how he often has some kid in the foreground commenting on the action in crazy gestures.

Check out some TOONERVILLE FOLKS cartoons for Fontaine Fox's 124th birthday!

fox self portrait

 
Posted By Art Baxter
HENRY Monday - 03

This HENRY cartoon was drawn by his creator Carl Anderson between 1932 and 1934 for the SATURDAY EVENING POST. Look for a new HENRY cartoon every Monday.

Find out more about HENRY here.


 
Posted By Art Baxter

dada-main

dada-3

The Three Faces of DADA

Episode #28 - "Human Specimens 5 & 6"
Written by Masahiko Yamada
Directed by Samaji Yanagase.
Original Broadcast Date: January, 22, 1967

Generally, I draw from the figure once a week. There weren't any classes between mid December and the beginning of February but I wanted to keep my hand in it. I thought it would be fun to draw some monsters from Eiji Tsuburaya's late 1960s TV show, ULTRAMAN. This is the first one.

DADA was a strange creature. It was unclear if he was from outer space or another dimension. He had a short stocky body with graphic black and white stripes (picture SEINFELD's George Costanza in a body stocking). He had a big head with a black helmit and big fish-lips that didn't move when he spoke. For some inexplicable reason he had three different faces. This Kaiju was unsettlingly weird and the overall effect of the design is greater than the actual execution of the costume. Needless to say, Ultraman sent him packing with little muss or fuss.

These monsters were fun to draw. There are more to come.


 

 

 
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